Friday, October 17, 2014

Big Weekend in Pismo Beach!

There's a lot going on in Pismo Beach this weekend!  Two of the biggest events of the year on the same weekend!  The Pismo Beach Clam Festival in Downtown Pismo and the Huckfest in the Pismo Dunes!  Here's some links to help you navigate through the excitement!



 The Pismo Beach Clam Festival
October 17-19: 68th Annual Pismo Beach Clam Festival

A community tradition since 1946, the Pismo Beach Clam Festival features a live parade, best local chowder contest, surf contest, food, Beer & Wine Garden and Pier Pub, music and the Friday night wine walk. For more information, please contact the Pismo Beach Chamber of Commerce at 800-443-7778 or visit www.pismochamber.com.



The Huckfest
October 17-19: 6th Annual Huckfest Off-Road Event & Concert
“Huckfest originally began as a group of friends who would show up at the Oceano Sand Dunes to jump their trucks for distance and glory.” Bragging rights were the only prizes to be awarded, but if you know anything about off-roaders you know that bragging rights are everything. Every year the group got bigger and bigger, more and more competitors showed up to test their metal and to claim those coveted rights. Eventually, it grew so large that Oceano SVRA Parks required permits for the 2012 event. Fast forward to 2013, the event grows by “leaps and bounds” from 5,000 spectators to over 15,000 in one year, an increase not anticipated by organizers.

The spirit of Huckfest has always been to go big or go home while putting on a good show. 2013 was big, bringing in competitors and spectators from across the country and debuting the first ever monster truck on the Oceano SVRA. Although there have been growing pains along the way, Huckfest continues to evolve with the original vision in mind. The show is bigger than ever and 2014 promises to be the best year yet. With a new spin on off-road, Huckfest is making its mark in the industry attracting all walks of life while promoting local economic growth and putting on the “gnarliest high-flying off-road action you will ever see.”
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Monday, September 29, 2014

Coors Light knows what they are doing when it comes to design and product display!

New Coors Light Packaging Showcases Design Innovation
BY CANDACE WALTERS
BRANDS


New Coors Light Packaging Made with Millennials in Mind

Why would Coors Light focus on design?

Well, consider this: According to research done by Kelton Global, 7 in 10 legal-drinking age millennial consumers said the last time they saw a product in a store they “had to have,” was because of the product’s design.

Add to that the consumer’s desire for fresh approaches, new experiences and design, and it’s clear why innovating the look and feel of the Coors Light pint and can is a big opportunity for Coors Light.

Coors Light 2014 Spring and Summer Packaging Designs

I was excited to be involved in the design development for the dynamic Coors Light spring and summer packaging designs. We developed a number of design solutions that were meant to show Coors Light in a new, refreshing way. After interviewing consumers, it was clear which designs rose to the top.

The spring “shatter” design represents the transition from winter to spring and breaking through the ice.
The summer design reminded people of good times with friends, summer holidays and refreshing Coors Light on a hot summer day.
The new approach to design is being extended to other Coors Light items and the whole team is excited to unveil our new limited availability t-shirt designs, making their debut this summer.
Coors Light strives to be the design leader in the beer industry. It’s an exciting time for the brand and I can’t wait to see how people respond. Keep an eye out for these new designs over the next few months and let us know what you think in the comments below!


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Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Is Watching Football Making You Smarter?

Is Watching Football Making You Smarter?
The Science Behind Why Being an NFL Fan Is Good For Your Brain
Article courtesy of AskMen.com
"Not only is watching football not causing you the kind of brain damage veteran linebackers have to worry about, it may actually be making you smarter."

If you're an American, chances are you watch football. In fact, chances are you watch a lot of football. A recent Harris poll determined that 73% of American men watch football on a weekly basis. A quarter of the football-watching public spends between 6 and 10 hours a week glued to their screens; another 6% spend the equivalent of a part-time job following their favorite teams. Yes, football has replaced churchgoing as America's most popular Sunday pastime. Amen. 

And while we here at AskMen certainly have no problem with that, there's a wider perception that, well, time spent eating nachos and cheering on your favorite team from the comfort of your couch is time wasted. That seems to go double if you paint your face and wave a giant foam finger around. Well, cheer up, faithful football fans: we're here to tell you otherwise. Not only is watching football not causing you the kind of brain damage veteran linebackers have to worry about, it may actually be making you smarter.  

Memory And Brain Function
Think of what it takes to be a diehard football fan. Chances are you can name every player on the team, when they joined the league, what college they went to, and what their season and career averages are across a half-dozen relevant statistical categories. A study commissioned by the Archives of Neurology found that repeated mental exercises like the ones done by devoted fans memorizing player stats not only provided a temporary boost in cognitive function but actually permanently altered brain structure — in other words, being a football nerd is actually literally improving your brain. That same study found that people who engaged in these mental games for long periods of time actually reduced their risk of contracting Alzheimer's disease in later life, so not only will your Sunday binge-watching make you smarter, it may also help stave off future brain decay (which is a pretty convincing argument if anyone’s trying to ask you to stop watching football and wash the dishes, for instance).

Language 
Football fans use language in unique ways, and part of being a fan is understanding the lexicon behind the game. Anyone who’s sat at a bar and listened uncomprehendingly to diehard fans discuss the finer aspects of their sport knows this all too well. A study out of the University of Chicago that used fMRI scans to monitor the brains of hockey players, fans and non-fans during a game found that just watching a sport or listening to a sport being discussed lit up the areas of the brain associated with language and linguistics. Basically, listening to football makes you a better listener in general.

Motor Function
One of the oldest and most important studies on sports spectating and cognition comes from the University of Parma, in Italy. Have you ever been watching a game and witnessed a spectacular feat of athleticism, like a one-hand, over-the-shoulder touchdown catch, or a nimble running back finding the smallest hole in the offensive line. Your jaw hits the floor and you ask how the hell anyone could do that?! Well, it turns out that your brain is silently piecing together the answer. While observing macaque monkeys, researchers discovered that the same areas of the brain that fired up when a monkey reached out to grab a delicious snack from a researcher's hand also fired up when the monkey was only watching that action being performed. They were teaching themselves how to perform the action just by watching. We’re not saying that you’re going to be the next Drew Brees just by watching the Saints QB run right and throw left, but you might just become a little less clumsy.
So the next time your girlfriend, wife or friends decide to hassle you about your watching too much football, sit back, take a long, slow drag of a fine cigar or a swig of your favorite brandy and inform this philistine that they need to avail themselves of the latest neuroscience research, posthaste. Then turn your painted face back to the TV and enjoy the rest of the game in peace.


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Tuesday, September 2, 2014

WE Completed the Challenge!


Harry's Night Club & Beach Bar 
has completed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge!
Vickie Stinson & Mike Frey completing the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge
 Click Here to watch the video of Mike Frey, owner at  Harry's, and Vickie Stinson, manager at Harry's, doing the Ice Bucket Challenge!

Just what is ALS?
Ice Bucket Challenge ALS was first found in 1869 by French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot, but it wasn’t until 1939 that Lou Gehrig brought national and international attention to the disease. Ending the career of one of the most beloved baseball players of all time, the disease is still most closely associated with his name. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neurons  die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control muscle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action progressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease may become totally paralyzed.

Spread Awareness
When doing the challenge, please use the hashtags #icebucketchallenge, #alsicebucketchallenge, and #strikeoutals.

Please be thoughtful about water usage! If you’re in an area of the country or world affected by drought, repurpose the water for later use or help spread ALS awareness by becoming an ALS advocate, joining the Walk to Defeat ALS® in your community, getting involved in our fundraisers, or sharing information about this disease via social media. Or you can make a donation instead at www.alsa.org/donate.


For more information, visit www.alsa.org.
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Friday, August 15, 2014

How to Drink Responsibly - 22 Steps


We at Harry's are all about having fun and keeping the party going!  But it's important to know how to drink responsibly. We want all of our patrons to have a great time, get home safe, and come back and visit us again and again! We care about your well-being and safety, as well as providing an amazing place to have an awesome good time here at Harry's! 

Here are a few steps to remind everyone how to enjoy your time while staying safe:


How to Drink Responsibly

If you drink alcohol, it's important to know how to drink responsibly and to stay within your alcohol tolerance level. If you don't, then you could hurt your friends and family and put yourself in grave danger. If you want to know how to drink responsibly, whether you're at a bar, a party, or any other place where people are drinking, then you have to make a game plan, know your limits, and know how to spot and avoid dangerous situations. If you want to know how to enjoy alcohol instead of letting alcohol take control of you, just follow these steps.

Part 1 of 3: Make a Game Plan

1. Drink with a group of friends. 
If you want to drink responsibly, then the first thing you should do is avoid drinking alone, or drinking with people you don't really know or trust all that well. If you're out on your own and have no one looking out for you, you can get in all kinds of trouble without anyone even knowing something's wrong. Whether you're heading to a party or out to the bars, always make sure to drink with a group of people you like and trust.

  • Don't drink with people who encourage binge drinking or look down on you for not drinking, or for not "keeping up" and drinking a lot. You should be comfortable to drink at your own pace.
  • Don't go out with people who have a reputation for running off to hook up with someone they meet at a bar or just disappearing in the middle of the night. Make sure you go with people you can rely on.

2. Create a "buddy system" with at least one of your friends. 
When you go out with friends, at least one of them should be a person who knows her own limit, or even who doesn't drink very much, and will be willing to watch out for you and to tell you when it looks like you've had enough. Sometimes, you could be drinking way over your limit while being too stubborn to admit it, and this friend can let you know when it's time to switch to water.

  • This friend can tell you when you've had enough, keep you from driving, and be prepared to take you home if you're having a rough night.
  • Don't abuse the "buddy system" -- if you're always that girl, no one will want to go out with you. You should be able to look out for your friend while she looks out for you.

3. Know your limits. 
Before all else, know yourself and your own limits. It doesn't take long to learn how little or how much alcohol you can tolerate and every body is unique in its ability to tolerate alcohol. Listen to your body and respond in a way that nurtures it rather than abuses it. The first time you drink, you should drink with close friends in the comfort of your own home or their homes, so that you don't get socially overwhelmed. This will help you get a sense of what you can and can not handle.

  • You can set your limits very concretely. Your limits could be "four glasses of wine in six hours," "four beers a night," or "two mixed drinks a night" (depending on what's in them). Tell yourself what your limits are before you leave so that you're more likely to stick to them throughout the night.
  • If it's your first time out drinking, it's important to adopt a steady and slow pace, so that you can come to learn your alcohol tolerance.

4. Know how you're getting home.
If you're going out with friends, you should know exactly how you're getting home the night before. There are a few options: the easiest is to have a designated driver before you go out, so you have a person who will forgo alcohol that night and get you home safely. You can also get home by taking a bus or other forms of public transportation or just call a cab or walk if you're close enough to the bar. Any of these plans are fine.

  • What you should not do is drive to the bar and hope that one of your friends can drive you home, or let someone who you know will drink a lot drive you there, hoping that someone else can take over the car later.
  • If you don't drive or have access to a car, regardless of the circumstance, never get into a car driven by someone else who has had too much to drink.
  • Never get into a car with a stranger if you're intoxicated. Alcohol affects your senses and judgment. Get his or her number and wait until you are sober before you decide to pursue him or her further.
  • Even if you're desperate to get home, it's better to pay for a cab or call a trusted friend to pick you up than to get in the car with someone who is drunk or a stranger just because it's more convenient.
  • Never drive drunk. Don't drive if you're even tipsy. Just one drink per hour can put you over the legal limit for driving. Even if you think you "feel fine," your BAC may indicate otherwise.

5. Drink when you're of legal age. If you're in the United States, that means 21, and if you're in other parts of the world, that age can typically range from 16-18. Don't go out with a fake ID or drink on a college campus if you're under 21, unless you're prepared to deal with the legal repercussions. If you're breaking the law, you're not being responsible. (We check everyone's ID at the door!)

6. Don't drink if you're not in a positive frame of mind.
Alcohol is a depressant, so if you're already feeling angry, upset, or just unstable, it is very likely to make you feel worse. Though you may think that drinking will make you have the time of your life and forget all of your problems, it'll actually make you feel much worse. You may feel an initial buzz and relief after your first drink or two, but you'll drink yourself into a much worse mood than you started with.

  • You should make a rule of only drinking when you're happy, not when you want to cope with your sadness.
  • Don't ever use drinking as a way to deal with your problems. You'll have to be sober to do that.
  • Don't go out and drink with someone you're mad at. The alcohol will make your anger come out, and you'll be much better off if you settle your conflicts when you're in a lucid frame of mind.

7. Don't drink on an empty stomach.
You will feel the effects of alcohol a lot faster if you drink on an empty stomach and increase the likelihood of feeling sick. Most food is better than none at all, but you should try to eat a more hearty meal that is rich in carbs and proteins that can help you absorb the alcohol, instead of just eating some fruit or a salad. Having a meal before you go out will make you much less likely to drink over your limit very quickly.

  • If you've arrived at a bar and realize you haven't eaten, order some food and have a quick bite to eat before you start drinking. Don't worry if this is a bit inconvenient or if it keeps you from drinking for a little while. It'll be worth it.

8. Check with your doctor to see if you can mix your prescription medications with alcohol. 
If you're on a prescription medication, check with your doctor to make sure that you can drink alcohol on the same day when you took it. It varies by medication, so make sure that you know if your prescription will have any negative interactions with alcohol before you start drinking.

9. Don't drink if you haven't had much sleep. 
If you're running on two or three hours of sleep, you'll be much better off hitting the hay than hitting up a bar. Alcohol will affect you much more intensely if you're already feeling woozy, tired, and not in control of your own mind and body because you're exhausted.

  • You may have stayed up studying for an exam the night before and could be dying for a celebratory drink with your friends, but you should hold off for another night until you feel well-rested.
  • Don't think that having a super dose of caffeine by chugging three cups of coffee or downing an energy drink will make things better. In fact, mixing a lot of caffeine and alcohol will make you feel even worse and more likely to crash.

Part 2 of 3: Manage Your Drinking

1. Stay hydrated.
Alcohol dehydrates and draws vitamins and minerals out of your body. Drink water, soda or water with added vitamins to restore your lost vitamins.

  • Drinking a 1 to 1 ratio of non-alcoholic to alcoholic beverages is a good policy – that's one serving of water for every serving of alcohol. It's always preferable to have a greater ratio of non-alcohol to alcohol.

2. Know what you're drinking.
While it's good to try something out for the first time, like a "Sex On The Beach" or a beer you've never had before, be aware of what its alcohol content is before stocking up on more than one. You may not always be able to detect the strength of the alcohol in your drink owing to sweeteners, milk or cream or other fillers that cover the alcohol. Moreover, your own personal reaction to an unfamiliar drink may be faster inebriation than with your usual drinks.

  • Some contents of mixed drinks can bring up your Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) more quickly than others, depending on your weight. Alcohol tolerance, like many believe, will not result in a lower BAC compared to a person who doesn't have tolerance built up.
  • It's true that beers are a safer choice than a mixed drink, but you should know the alcohol content of the beer you're drinking. Though many have an alcohol content of 4-5%, some beers can have an alcohol content of 8-9% or more, which can make a big difference.

3. Have no more than one drink per hour.
If you want to drink responsibly, then you should have no more than one drink per hour. "One drink" means one 12 oz. beer, one 5 oz. glass of wine, or one 1.5 oz. shot of 40% alcohol per hour. It may be tough to stick to this limit when your friends are drinking much more, but this is the way to be safe. Sipping on a beer or nursing a glass of wine will take longer than taking a shot and is recommended because the alcohol won't hit you all at once.

  • People often have more than one drink per hour just because they have nothing to do with their hands and start fidgeting or feeling nervous when they're not holding a drink. If this is the case with you, just hold onto a water or a club soda in between drinks so there's always something in your hands.

4. Pace yourself. 
It's important to keep a steady pace when you're drinking. It can take time for alcohol to take its effect. You might feel okay for another shot after a couple of minutes, but keep in mind that you probably haven't felt its effects just yet. Nibble on some food or drink some water in the meantime, to allow the alcohol to diffuse through your body.

5. Avoid drinking games.
Though drinking games like bullshit, kings, beer pong, and flip-cup may be a great way to pass time at a party and make some friends you'll never remember, these games encourage extreme binge drinking and are guaranteed to make you forget where you are in just a few minutes.

  • You can also play these games by discreetly pouring out the alcohol you "should" drink, or passing it on to a friend who hasn't had a lot to drink.

Part 3 of 3: Avoid Dangerous Situations

1. Get comfortable with your surroundings.
If you're at a house party, get acquainted with the people who own the house and its facilities. Know where the bathroom is. Find a secluded place and choose to keep your shoes or coat there (but never your purse or wallet). If you find that you are losing control, quickly make an excuse ("I left my phone in my coat pocket!") and go to that secluded place to calm down and/or to dump drinks. If you need to get home, find the house owners and ask them to call a taxi or to arrange for a sober person to take you home.

  • If you're in a public place, make note of all of the exits upon your arrival. You should do this instinctively in case of an emergency such as a fire outbreak so that you know in advance the closest point of exit. It is also helpful to know where the nearest cab rank or public transportation stop is located to the place you're at. Don't make things harder for yourself; always have an exit strategy.
  • Make sure you know how to get home by heart. If you get drunk to the point of losing your memory, your self-preservation will be as impaired as your inhibitions and you may become easily lost. If you don't know how to get home, you probably shouldn't go out drinking.

2. Avoid peer pressure. 
Always remember that you're drinking to enjoy and have fun, not to show off. The whole point of drinking is to enjoy the drink, enjoy the company and feel free. You don't need to "keep up," or engage in stupid competitions that could ruin the night and even friendships. If you're hanging out with people who encourage you to drink more even though you don't want to, then you're hanging out with the wrong people.

  • If you really want people to stop bugging you about why you're not drinking more, hold a club soda or Coke in your hands and put a lime in it so people will think you're driving and will leave you alone. This is a good short-term solution; the long-term solution is to stay away from people who put unwanted pressure on you.

3. Stop drinking if you start to feel drunk. 
Symptoms of intoxication include feeling a loss of control over your thoughts, blurry vision, slurred speech, and difficulty with maintaining your balance.

4. Stop drinking if you vomit.
While this is generally a given, it's important that you don't attempt to drink any more alcohol, even if you feel "better" once you've thrown up. Vomiting is a signal that your body can't take the amount of alcohol that you have consumed and the rejection is your body's last line of defense coming into play. At this stage, you have truly overdone it and it's now time to care about your health rather than your partying.

  • If you feel the urge to vomit, then you should go to a bathroom and do it. Vomiting is a way for your body to release the excess of alcohol that doesn't belong in your system. You shouldn't force yourself to vomit, but you shouldn't hold it in, either.

5. Lie on your side if you're feeling sick.
Whether you've thrown up, feel like you might throw up, or just feel terrible, you should lie down on your side to prevent yourself from choking on your vomit if you're lying on your back. Keep a bucket by your mouth and be prepared to throw up if it's necessary. If you find yourself in this unpleasant state, don't go home by yourself -- have a trusted friend stay the night so she can watch over you when you need help.

  • If you are feeling sick, experiencing headaches or anything feels wrong, tell someone. A responsible person needs to keep a watch over you in case you've developed alcohol poisoning and need medical intervention quickly.
  • If you see someone else who is really sick lying down, make sure to turn that person over on his or her side, too.

6. Don't make any sexual choices when you've been drinking. 
Though you may think that alcohol may give you some liquid courage to finally talk to, or to hook up with, your crush, it can actually impair your decision-making process and can lead you to do something you'll deeply regret later. You can flirt a little, get a guy or girl's number, and check back in when you're sober, but you should avoid going home with anyone you just met, or even just making out at a bar -- it's not classy behavior, and you won't be proud of yourself later.

7. Don't accept a drink from a stranger. 
If you've walked into a party and a guy offers you a drink right away, don't accept it unless you see him make it or grab it for you so you know exactly what it's the drink. If the guy just grabs you a beer from a cooler, then that's fine, but if he disappears into the kitchen and returns with a "mystery drink" that may be filled with alcohol or even date-rape drugs, then you'll be in the middle of a very dangerous situation.

  • You don't have to be rude about declining the drink. Just be honest about your reasoning. It's better to look unfriendly than to be in danger.

8. Don't leave your drink unattended.
Your drink should be in your hand or at least in your sight at all times, whether you're at a party or at a bar. If you set your drink down and walk away, someone could mess with your drink, or you could even end up picking up a stronger drink by mistake, thinking it was yours.

  • If you get up to go to the restroom, get a close friend to hold your drink for you or take it with you. This will help you avoid anyone tampering with your drink.

Click here to read the full article

Local Taxis:

  • Central Coast Taxi (805) 202-1370
  • Beach Cities Cab Co. (805) 543-1234
  • Five City Taxi (805) 773-TAXI (8294)
  • Taxi in Pismo (805) 234-TAXI (8294)
  • Yellow Cab (805) 489-1155
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Friday, August 8, 2014

Harry's is now pouring Sextant Wines on tap!





Harry's is now serving Sextant Wines on tap.  We offer Chardonnay, Pinot Gris, Zinfandel & Cabernet. Premium wine in kegs never sees oxygen, so it’s guaranteed fresh all the time!  So next time you're in the mood for a premier glass of wine, stop by Harry's!

If you'd like to learn more about Sextant Wines, visit their website at www.sextantwine.com. Also, below is an article we wanted to share with you by Touring & Tasting featuring Sextant Wines.  Enjoy!

About Sextant Wines
Article courtesy of www.touringandtasting.com

As Wine Enthusiast crowns Paso Robles 2014 Wine Region of the Year, Sextant Wines can be found at the helm. When Craig and Nancy Stoller founded Sextant Wines nearly 10 years ago, they decided that a Sextant—an old-world instrument using the sun, stars, and horizon to navigate across open water—aptly described Craig’s philosophy on growing and making wine.

As a third-generation grapevine grower, the farming side of the business was nothing new to Craig. He and Nancy started their own vineyard in 2003, planting clones from several certified French, Portuguese, and Spanish winegrape selections, as well as rootstock from UC-Davis. Today, they produce Chardonnay and Pinot Noir from their cool climate vineyards, but their specialties are distinct Zinfandels, GSMs, and a Bordeaux blend. The winery is devoted to expanding the horizons of California’s Central Coast by using carefully selected old-world varieties harvested from three vineyards from three distinct AVAs: Sextant Vineyards in Templeton; MacGregor Vineyards in Edna Valley; and Chalk Knoll Vineyards in San Ardo.

Winemaker Steve Martell, fondly known as the wine shepherd, joined Sextant in 2010. He spends a considerable amount of time in the vineyards, getting to know each vine. “Steve’s refined sensory skill, combined with his innate natural winemaking approach, is a perfect match for the style of wine I want Sextant to be known for,” Craig says.

Wine tourists are invited to navigate, explore, and discover Sextant’s wines in two tasting room locations. The first can be found along the wine trail in the historic and quaint town of Old Edna. The second, the Estate, is located in West Paso Robles along Highway 46. This new, state-of-the-art tasting room is a must-visit, offering guests an overhead peek at Sextant’s production facility. They can pour their own tastings from an Enomatic dispensing machine, or relax by the fire in the members only suite. This new home to Sextant Wines is an engaging place to explore exceptional wines.
Read original article on Touring & Tasting




Sextant Wines
2324 W Hwy 46
Paso Robles, CA  93446
Phone: 805.542.0133

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Monday, August 4, 2014

Google Photo Shoot


This Wednesday August 6, 2014  from 4:00-6:00pm we will be doing a Google Photo Shoot at Harry’s Pismo Beach. The first 50 people to show up will be in the photo that will live for infinity on Google. Please dress California casual, (no flip flops, tanks or bikini’s), hipsters encouraged. 

We will be taking 15-22 photos of the inside of Harry’s Bar.  You do not have to stay the entire time, but that is encouraged. 
 
We are also looking for classic beach vehicles or motorcycle to be parked out front and in the picture.

Everyone will be required to sign an all inclusive photo release.


Call or email Teri with any questions, (805) 305-0579, livewell@teribayus.com.